Tag Archives: meghan markle

TV REVIEW: Channel 4’s The Windsors

thewindsors

Channel 4

Channel 4’s spoof royal soap opera The Windsors – which just returned for a second run – may not be subtle, but it’s a fun distraction, and if there’s any one thing this blogger is addicted to, it is fun distractions.

I know a lot of people think the show is puerile.

Yes, the actors (led by Harry Enfield as Prince Charles) all give outrageous, panto performances. They’re either gin-soaked villains and/or monumentally, irredeemably stupid.

Save for the Duke of Edinburgh’s expletive-riddled written missives (“Dear Funny Foreigner…”) which are read out by other characters, the Queen and her husband are absent, which is more than fine, as they’ve got The Crown, and it’s on Netflix and it’s waaay more prestigious.

And although The Windsors is meant to be silly, all the characters are actually quite sweet and sad and touching, like poor Fergie (Katy Wix), desperate to be allowed back into the fold.

I’ve read the anonymous comments about the real Royal Family on places like Mail Online and people can be harsh and resentful (to put it lightly). Then there are fawning blogs, where for ‘Princess Kate’ fans, she’s Cinderella. (The Windsors writers Bert Tyler-Moore and George Jeffrie have the former Miss Middleton as a gullible sweetheart from a family of travellers.)

With the media focus on the ‘main three’ of Kate, William and Harry, Fergie’s girls have been relegated to bit-part players, but Tyler-Moore and Jeffrie have made B&E (Ellie White and Celeste Dring) main characters, which is nice. They’re depicted as airhead Sloanes who didn’t get the memo that they’re on the fringes of their own family, which..isn’t so nice.

It makes me feel almost sorry for the real Yorks, who sadly lack a certain media-friendly, fashion-savvy charm (constantly referred to as the ‘ugly stepsisters’), unlike the willowy Delevingne sisters, or even the Middletons. (I’ve written before that nothing would end the monarchy faster than an unattractive princess/future queen waiting in the wings.)

Pippa too (played here by the very talented Morgana Robinson as a vampish vixen seething with sisterly jealousy) can’t be seen to be having too much fun, before some online commentator yells: “Your sister is royal not you!!!” It’s as if to kowtow to the Cambridges, we have to remind ourselves we have some dignity by gloating at the position of the ‘lesser’ royals and royals-by-association.

Miss Markle, are you sure you want to join the cast of this real-life institution?!

The Windsors series 2 consists of six episodes. It continues on Channel 4 in the UK on Wednesdays. Get ready for the arrival of one President Trump!

TV REVIEW: King Charles III on BBC2 and PBS

charlesiii

BBC/Drama Republic

When “Charles III” trended on Twitter last Wednesday there were probably more than a few people who feared that an era had ended.

Luckily, Wednesday’s tweets were about the BBC TV adaptation of Mike Bartlett’s award-winning future history play.

After the glossy Netflix hit The Crown, and ITV’s vapid Victoria, it was a more unsettling production. First staged in 2014, it imagines the current Prince of Wales as a tormented ruler who causes constitutional chaos by refusing to grant Royal Assent to a bill passed by Parliament.

What draconian new law upsets Charles so much he’d risk the monarchy? Banning homeopathy on the NHS? War on one of his other pet causes? Nope, he’s royally peeved about a nasty bit of legislation that restricts the freedom of the press. (Hooray for Charles! Journalists probably aren’t his favourite people.) Cue rioting outside the palace and Diana apparitions wafting down the corridors.

The actors in this play-turned-TV-drama make the blank verse dialogue sound easy (most of the cast are veterans from the stage run): the late Tim Pigott-Smith is Charles; Chris Oliver is a dithering, weak-willed Wills; Richard Goulding a dour, hunched, Daniel Radcliffe-like (Prince) Harry.

The cast aren’t doing impersonations so much as original portrayals of real people in a parallel universe; the only thing Goulding’s Harry shares with the prince is red hair.

And poor Harry! While the real ‘spare’ has created a role for himself, in the play he’s a ‘ginger joke’. There are really embarrassing, unbelievable scenes featuring the melancholy prince with Working Class Londoners who don’t recognize him.

There’s an unlikely love interest in a working-class woman named Jessica (Tamara Lawrance), who is not Meghan Markle, the glam, highly-educated American actress and true-life Harry girlfriend. She came along too late to be written in, although there is Camilla (Margot Leicester), and there is Kate (Charlotte Riley.)

The BBC were criticised for portraying William’s wife as a scheming Lady Macbeth when Catherine has actually always seemed more quietly traditional than quietly revolutionary. While the real Kate doesn’t seem career-driven or interested in public service or power, in Bartlett’s play her children’s royal status is jeopardized, and she acts to protect them and their social standing. (Charlotte Riley defended her character as ‘just being pragmatic’…)

Charles III might be a little alienating and cold for some audiences, what with its Shakespearean black verse and apparitions etc. It reminded me of Pablo Larraín’s crazy Jackie biopic: it’s a dark little 90 minute horror with powerful, haunting music (by Jocelyn Pook), set in a country in limbo and mourning.

More Royal Drama for 2017: The Crown, Victoria on PBS, King Charles III

Following the Golden Globes last weekend, the internet’s post-ceremony commentary involved mocking Tom Hiddleston and gushing over Meryl Streep.

I think the real star speech was made by Claire Foy, who took home the Best Actress in a TV series (Drama) award for playing HM The Queen in Netflix’s The Crown.

 

  • Victoria Review -“WHERE ARE MY DRAGONS?!!!”
  • The Crown Review – I kept expecting Matt Smith to suggest a Doctor Who-themed nursery for Charles and Anne 

Writer and creator Peter Morgan has committed to six seasons of The Crown, each focusing on a decade of the Queen’s reign. Filming is already underway on the second season, with a November release likely.

If Foy is popular in The Crown, she’s better as Anne Boleyn in the adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall, about the rise of Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII’s chief minister. I’ve just watched the series after finding it on Netflix, and I really recommend it.

I was asked if The Crown was like Downton Abbey. No, but it’s not as gripping as Wolf Hall; there was real peril in the Tudor court.

Dearly departed Downtown’s true heir is in fact ITV’s Victoria, the first series of which debuts in America on Masterpiece on PBS this weekend. Lucky guys! Personally I can’t wait for the second series to show in the UK, so that I can take the piss review a really popular show. Jenna Coleman is the spirited young monarch and Tom Hughes is Prince Albert Emo, the original right-on royal with a social conscience.

And there’s even more royal drama to look forward to, like King Charles III….No not like that – I mean I’m sure Charles will be a wonderful king – but it’s actually the title of a new one-off BBC TV drama based on a play by Mike Bartlett.

I caught the royal history bug early (I watched my mother’s VHS tapes of the BBC series Elizabeth I starring Glenda Jackson before I started infant school). But Charles III isn’t history – it’s a future where Charles is finally in charge and causes a political ruckus. Charlotte Riley, who is probably still best known for being married to Tom Hardy, is Kate Middleton. Riley described the Duchess as “a really interesting woman”.

Sure. Has enough time passed for a serious drama about the girlfriend years? It’d beat the ratings for Anne Boleyn, QEII and a Harry/Meghan wedding combined!